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0  structures 7  species 0  interactions 11  sequences 1  architecture

Family: ENOD40 (PF08247)

Summary: ENOD40 protein

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This is the Wikipedia entry entitled "ENOD40". More...

ENOD40 Edit Wikipedia article

ENOD40
ENOD40-1 peptide seqlogo.png
A sequence logo for the ENOD40 peptide.
Identifiers
Symbol ENOD40
Pfam PF08247
InterPro IPR013186
ENOD40
ENOD40 secondary structure and sequence conservation.png
ENOD40 secondary structure and sequence conservation
Identifiers
Symbol ENOD40
Rfam RF01845
Other data
RNA type Non-coding RNA
Domain(s) Magnoliophyta

enod40, also known as early nodulin 40, is a gene found in flowering plants. The gene has characteristics of both protein and Non-coding RNA genes.[1] There is some evidence that the non-coding characteristics of this gene are more widely conserved than the protein coding sequences.[2] In soyabeans enod40 was found to be expressed during early stages of formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules that are associated with symbiotic soil rhizobial bacteria. [3] [4] The gene is also active in roots containing fungi forming phosphate-acquiring arbuscular mycorrhiza. [5] An interaction with a novel RNA-binding protein MtRBP1 (Medicago truncatula RNA-binding protein 1) investigated in the development of Root nodule suggests ENOD40 has a function of cytoplasmic relocalization of nuclear proteins.[6] In the study of non-legume plants, the over-expression of ENOD40 in transgenic Arabidopsis lines was observed a reduction of cell expansion.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Crespi MD, Jurkevitch E, Poiret M, d'Aubenton-Carafa Y, Petrovics G, Kondorosi E, Kondorosi A (1994). "enod40, a gene expressed during nodule organogenesis, codes for a non-translatable RNA involved in plant growth.". EMBO J 13 (21): 5099–112. PMC 395456. PMID 7957074. 
  2. ^ Gultyaev AP, Roussis A (2007). "Identification of conserved secondary structures and expansion segments in enod40 RNAs reveals new enod40 homologues in plants.". Nucleic Acids Res 35 (9): 3144–52. doi:10.1093/nar/gkm173. PMC 1888808. PMID 17452360. 
  3. ^ Yang WC, Katinakis P, Hendriks P, Smolders A, de Vries F, Spee J, van Kammen A, Bisseling T, Franssen H (1993). "Characterization of GmENOD40, a gene showing novel patterns of cell-specific expression during soybean nodule development.". Plant J 3 (4): 573–85. doi:10.1046/j.1365-313X.1993.03040573.x. PMID 8220464. 
  4. ^ Kouchi H, Hata S (1993). "Isolation and characterization of novel nodulin cDNAs representing genes expressed at early stages of soybean nodule development.". Mol Gen Genet 238 (1-2): 106–19. PMID 7683079. 
  5. ^ van Rhijn P, Fang Y, Galili S, Shaul O, Atzmon N, Wininger S, Eshed Y, Lum M, Li Y, To V, Fujishige N, Kapulnik Y, Hirsch AM (1997). "Expression of early nodulin genes in alfalfa mycorrhizae indicates that signal transduction pathways used in forming arbuscular mycorrhizae and Rhizobium-induced nodules may be conserved.". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94 (10): 5467–72. doi:10.1073/pnas.94.10.5467. PMID 11038545. 
  6. ^ Campalans A, Kondorosi A, Crespi M (2004). "Enod40, a short open reading frame-containing mRNA, induces cytoplasmic localization of a nuclear RNA binding protein in Medicago truncatula.". Plant Cell 16 (4): 1047–59. doi:10.1105/tpc.019406. PMC 412876. PMID 15037734. 
  7. ^ Guzzo F, Portaluppi P, Grisi R, Barone S, Zampieri S, Franssen H, Levi M (2005). "Reduction of cell size induced by enod40 in Arabidopsis thaliana.". J Exp Bot 56 (412): 507–13. doi:10.1093/jxb/eri028. PMID 15557291. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Podkowinski J, Zmienko A, Florek B, Wojciechowski P, Rybarczyk A, Wrzesinski J, Ciesiolka J, Blazewicz J, Kondorosi A, Crespi M, Legocki A (2009). "Translational and structural analysis of the shortest legume ENOD40 gene in Lupinus luteus.". Acta Biochim Pol 56 (1): 89–102. PMID 19287803. 
  • Wan X, Hontelez J, Lillo A, Guarnerio C, van de Peut D, Fedorova E, Bisseling T, Franssen H (2007). "Medicago truncatula ENOD40-1 and ENOD40-2 are both involved in nodule initiation and bacteroid development.". J Exp Bot 58 (8): 2033–41. doi:10.1093/jxb/erm072. PMID 17452749. 
  • Gultyaev AP, Roussis A (2007). "Identification of conserved secondary structures and expansion segments in enod40 RNAs reveals new enod40 homologues in plants.". Nucleic Acids Res 35 (9): 3144–52. doi:10.1093/nar/gkm173. PMC 1888808. PMID 17452360. 
  • Murakami Y, Miwa H, Imaizumi-Anraku H, Kouchi H, Downie JA, Kawaguchi M, Kawasaki S (2006). "Positional cloning identifies Lotus japonicus NSP2, a putative transcription factor of the GRAS family, required for NIN and ENOD40 gene expression in nodule initiation.". DNA Res 13 (6): 255–65. doi:10.1093/dnares/dsl017. PMID 17244637. 
  • Lee A, Lum MR, Hirsch AM (2007). "ENOD40 Gene Expression and Cytokinin Responses in the Nonnodulating, Nonmycorrhizal (NodMyc) Mutant, Masym3, of Melilotus alba Desr.". Plant Signal Behav 2 (1): 33–42. PMC 2633896. PMID 19516966. 
  • Ruttink T, Boot K, Kijne J, Bisseling T, Franssen H (2006). "ENOD40 affects elongation growth in tobacco Bright Yellow-2 cells by alteration of ethylene biosynthesis kinetics.". J Exp Bot 57 (12): 3271–82. doi:10.1093/jxb/erl089. PMID 16957021. 
  • Grønlund M, Roussis A, Flemetakis E, Quaedvlieg NE, Schlaman HR, Umehara Y, Katinakis P, Stougaard J, Spaink HP (2005). "Analysis of promoter activity of the early nodulin Enod40 in Lotus japonicus.". Mol Plant Microbe Interact 18 (5): 414–27. doi:10.1094/MPMI-18-0414. PMID 15915640. 
  • Röhrig H, John M, Schmidt J (2004). "Modification of soybean sucrose synthase by S-thiolation with ENOD40 peptide A.". Biochem Biophys Res Commun 325 (3): 864–70. doi:10.1016/j.bbrc.2004.10.100. PMID 15541370. 
  • Dey M, Complainville A, Charon C, Torrizo L, Kondorosi A, Crespi M, Datta S (2004). "Phytohormonal responses in enod40-overexpressing plants of Medicago truncatula and rice.". Physiol. Plant. 120 (1): 132–139. doi:10.1111/j.0031-9317.2004.0208.x. PMID 15032885. 
  • Compaan B, Ruttink T, Albrecht C, Meeley R, Bisseling T, Franssen H (2003). "Identification and characterization of a Zea mays line carrying a transposon-tagged ENOD40.". Biochim Biophys Acta 1629 (1-3): 84–91. doi:10.1016/j.bbaexp.2003.08.004. PMID 14522083. 
  • Vleghels I, Hontelez J, Ribeiro A, Fransz P, Bisseling T, Franssen H (2003). "Expression of ENOD40 during tomato plant development.". Planta 218 (1): 42–9. doi:10.1007/s00425-003-1081-9. PMID 14508686. 
  • Santi C, von Groll U, Ribeiro A, Chiurazzi M, Auguy F, Bogusz D, Franche C, Pawlowski K (2003). "Comparison of nodule induction in legume and actinorhizal symbioses: the induction of actinorhizal nodules does not involve ENOD40.". Mol Plant Microbe Interact 16 (9): 808–16. doi:10.1094/MPMI.2003.16.9.808. PMID 12971604. 
  • Girard G, Roussis A, Gultyaev AP, Pleij CW, Spaink HP (2003). "Structural motifs in the RNA encoded by the early nodulation gene enod40 of soybean.". Nucleic Acids Res 31 (17): 5003–15. doi:10.1093/nar/gkg721. PMID 12930950. 
  • Larsen K (2003). "Molecular cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding a ryegrass (Lolium perenne) ENOD40 homologue.". J Plant Physiol 160 (6): 675–87. doi:10.1078/0176-1617-00962. PMID 12872490. 
  • Favery B, Complainville A, Vinardell JM, Lecomte P, Vaubert D, Mergaert P, Kondorosi A, Kondorosi E, Crespi M, Abad P (2002). "The endosymbiosis-induced genes ENOD40 and CCS52a are involved in endoparasitic-nematode interactions in Medicago truncatula.". Mol Plant Microbe Interact 15 (10): 1008–13. doi:10.1094/MPMI.2002.15.10.1008. PMID 12437298. 
  • Varkonyi-Gasic E, White DW (2002). "The white clover enod40 gene family. Expression patterns of two types of genes indicate a role in vascular function.". Plant Physiol 129 (3): 1107–18. doi:10.1104/pp.010916. PMID 12114565. 
  • Rohrig H, Schmidt J, Miklashevichs E, Schell J, John M (2002). "Soybean ENOD40 encodes two peptides that bind to sucrose synthase.". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99 (4): 1915–20. doi:10.1073/pnas.022664799. PMC 122294. PMID 11842184. 
  • Staehelin C, Charon C, Boller T, Crespi M, Kondorosi A (2001). "Medicago truncatula plants overexpressing the early nodulin gene enod40 exhibit accelerated mycorrhizal colonization and enhanced formation of arbuscules.". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98 (26): 15366–71. doi:10.1073/pnas.251491698. PMID 11752473. 
  • Imaizumi-Anraku H, Kouchi H, Syono K, Akao S, Kawaguchi M (2000). "Analysis of ENOD40 expression in alb1, a symbiotic mutant of Lotus japonicus that forms empty nodules with incompletely developed nodule vascular bundles.". Mol Gen Genet 264 (4): 402–10. doi:10.1007/s004380000330. PMID 11129043. 
  • Sousa C, Johansson C, Charon C, Manyani H, Sautter C, Kondorosi A, Crespi M (2001). "Translational and structural requirements of the early nodulin gene enod40, a short-open reading frame-containing RNA, for elicitation of a cell-specific growth response in the alfalfa root cortex.". Mol Cell Biol 21 (1): 354–66. doi:10.1128/MCB.21.1.354-366.2001. PMID 11113209. 
  • Flemetakis E, Kavroulakis N, Quaedvlieg NE, Spaink HP, Dimou M, Roussis A, Katinakis P (2000). "Lotus japonicus contains two distinct ENOD40 genes that are expressed in symbiotic, nonsymbiotic, and embryonic tissues.". Mol Plant Microbe Interact 13 (9): 987–94. doi:10.1094/MPMI.2000.13.9.987. PMID 10975655. 
  • Charon C, Sousa C, Crespi M, Kondorosi A (1999). "Alteration of enod40 expression modifies medicago truncatula root nodule development induced by sinorhizobium meliloti". Plant Cell 11 (10): 1953–66. doi:10.1105/tpc.11.10.1953. PMID 10521525. 
  • Kouchi H, Takane K, So RB, Ladha JK, Reddy PM (1999). "Rice ENOD40: isolation and expression analysis in rice and transgenic soybean root nodules.". Plant J 18 (2): 121–9. doi:10.1046/j.1365-313X.1999.00432.x. PMID 10363365. 
  • Mirabella R, Martirani L, Lamberti A, Iaccarino M, Chiurazzi M (1999). "The soybean ENOD40(2) promoter is active in Arabidopsis thaliana and is temporally and spatially regulated.". Plant Mol Biol 39 (1): 177–81. doi:10.1023/A:1006146627301. PMID 10080720. 
  • Corich V, Goormachtig S, Lievens S, Van Montagu M, Holsters M (1998). "Patterns of ENOD40 gene expression in stem-borne nodules of Sesbania rostrata.". Plant Mol Biol 37 (1): 67–76. doi:10.1023/A:1005925607793. PMID 9620265. 
  • Fang Y, Hirsch AM (1998). "Studying early nodulin gene ENOD40 expression and induction by nodulation factor and cytokinin in transgenic alfalfa.". Plant Physiol 116 (1): 53–68. doi:10.1104/pp.116.1.53. PMID 9449836. 
  • Charon C, Johansson C, Kondorosi E, Kondorosi A, Crespi M (1997). "enod40 induces dedifferentiation and division of root cortical cells in legumes.". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 94 (16): 8901–6. doi:10.1073/pnas.94.16.8901. PMID 11038563. 
  • van de Sande K, Pawlowski K, Czaja I, Wieneke U, Schell J, Schmidt J, Walden R, Matvienko M, Wellink J, van Kammen A, Franssen H, Bisseling T (1996). "Modification of phytohormone response by a peptide encoded by ENOD40 of legumes and a nonlegume.". Science 273 (5273): 370–3. doi:10.1126/science.273.5273.370. PMID 8662527.  (Retracted. If this is intentional, please replace {{Retracted}} with {{Retracted|intentional=yes}}.)
  • Minami E, Kouchi H, Cohn JR, Ogawa T, Stacey G (1996). "Expression of the early nodulin, ENOD40, in soybean roots in response to various lipo-chitin signal molecules.". Plant J 10 (1): 23–32. doi:10.1046/j.1365-313X.1996.10010023.x. PMID 8758977. 
  • Papadopoulou K, Roussis A, Katinakis P (1996). "Phaseolus ENOD40 is involved in symbiotic and non-symbiotic organogenetic processes: expression during nodule and lateral root development.". Plant Mol Biol 30 (3): 403–17. doi:10.1007/BF00049320. PMID 8605294. 
  • Crespi MD, Jurkevitch E, Poiret M, d'Aubenton-Carafa Y, Petrovics G, Kondorosi E, Kondorosi A (1994). "enod40, a gene expressed during nodule organogenesis, codes for a non-translatable RNA involved in plant growth.". EMBO J 13 (21): 5099–112. PMC 395456. PMID 7957074. 
  • Matvienko M, Van de Sande K, Yang WC, van Kammen A, Bisseling T, Franssen H (1994). "Comparison of soybean and pea ENOD40 cDNA clones representing genes expressed during both early and late stages of nodule development.". Plant Mol Biol 26 (1): 487–93. doi:10.1007/BF00039559. PMID 7948896. 

External links[edit]

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This tab holds the annotation information that is stored in the Pfam database. As we move to using Wikipedia as our main source of annotation, the contents of this tab will be gradually replaced by the Wikipedia tab.

ENOD40 protein Provide feedback

Rohrig et al. reported the in vitro translation of two peptides of 12 and 24 amino acids from the short, overlapping ORFs of soybean ENOD40 mRNA [1]. The putative role of the enod40 genes has been in favour of organogenesis, such as induction of the cortical cell divisions that lead to initiation of nodule primordia, in developing lateral roots and embryonic tissues. This supports the hypothesis for a role of enod40 in lateral organ development [2].

Literature references

  1. Rohrig H, Schmidt J, Miklashevichs E, Schell J, John M; , Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2002;99:1915-1920.: Soybean ENOD40 encodes two peptides that bind to sucrose synthase. PUBMED:11842184 EPMC:11842184

  2. Varkonyi-Gasic E, White DW; , Plant Physiol 2002;129:1107-1118.: The white clover enod40 gene family. Expression patterns of two types of genes indicate a role in vascular function. PUBMED:12114565 EPMC:12114565


External database links

This tab holds annotation information from the InterPro database.

InterPro entry IPR013186

The soybean early nodulin 40 (ENOD40) mRNA contains two short overlapping ORFs; in vitro translation yields two peptides of 12 and 24 amino acids [PUBMED:11842184]. The putative role of the ENOD40 genes has been in favour of organogenesis, such as induction of the cortical cell divisions that lead to initiation of nodule primordia, in developing lateral roots and embryonic tissues. This supports the hypothesis for a role of ENOD40 in lateral organ development [PUBMED:12114565].

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Seed source: Short protein clustering
Previous IDs: none
Type: Family
Author: Rossi R
Number in seed: 4
Number in full: 11
Average length of the domain: 12.30 aa
Average identity of full alignment: 76 %
Average coverage of the sequence by the domain: 100.00 %

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build method: hmmbuild -o /dev/null HMM SEED
search method: hmmsearch -Z 23193494 -E 1000 --cpu 4 HMM pfamseq
Model details:
Parameter Sequence Domain
Gathering cut-off 20.4 20.4
Trusted cut-off 22.7 22.7
Noise cut-off 17.8 16.3
Model length: 12
Family (HMM) version: 6
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